Nantucket is/is not done

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The blue sweater aka Norah Gaughan’s Nantucket Jacket from Interweave Knits Winter 2006 is knit and sewn together. I used Sirdar Supersoft Toddler Aran on size 8 circulars.

I actually had all the crochet edging done too but I frogged it before I took this picture. (I’m new to crochet and my tension was too, too tight. It made the edges curl in unattractively. Pyewacket has offered to crochet the edges for me since she is a crochet pro.)

I did a blog search for others that have knit Nantucket to see what their impressions were of it. Russell Yarn has actually started a KAL for Nantucket. She also has a post that mentions some of the problems that I saw with the pattern. Here are my impressions:

The bad:
The body of the sweater is too short for people with long torsos. I would need about 3-4 more inches before being completely comfortable. (Although, I might have to concede that the shortness was cute when I tried it on over a dress, I don’t have enough dresses that match it to justify a shorty.) You definitely want to check the length before proceeding since it is knit bottom up. While the body is a bit wide on me, the arms are too tight for my arms. I wish I had thought to check the arm size before knitting the sweater. I am going to try blocking out the wideness but I know that blocking won’t help the arms. Also, the tight seed stitch on the underarms looks very unattractive on moi.

Edited to add:ย  If you look at the original Nantucket on the front cover of IK Winter, you will see that the tight arms are making the jacket shoulders pull down onto the back.ย  This is exactly what my Nantucket does and it makes the jacket ride up in the front.

The good:
I loved, loved, loved knitting this pattern! The pattern was easy to remember, and it was very quick. The collar rolls over perfectly. I love the way the seed stitch looks in contrast to the cables and twisted stitches. The crochet edging is the perfect touch to the pattern. I liked the crochet edging enough to continue it around the bottom of the sweater too.

My mods:
I didn’t care for the raw edge look on the bottom of this sweater (but I didn’t put that in ‘the bad’ because it is a personal preference) so I extended the crochet edging around the body. I didn’t like the elbow-length sleeves so I made my sleeves full-length with notches at the wrist… I definitely liked the longer length. I did originally add an inch to the length but it got eaten by a mistake I made halfway up the sweater. I also put notches on the sides of the sweater body… I thought it looked good. I substituted the yarn for something in my stash… the gauge was right on.

The unfortunate:
Because of the length and width problems, I am contemplating frogging the sweater and starting over. That shows how much I loved the pattern because I’m willing to start over! I would make it longer, narrower, and add width to the sleeves (as well as having longer sleeves).

To frog or not to frog, that is the question. And I’m not tying in all those ends until I have decided!

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12 thoughts on “Nantucket is/is not done

  1. Wow, what a great insightful post…if you don’t mind, I’ll link to it on the KAL blog. I liked reading the impressions from someone who has finished it, especially since you confirm some suspicions I’ve had about the pattern (such as it being a wee bit short, etc.). And such a gorgeous color yarn too…I love it!

  2. It is so nice, I suppose frogging sucks. But if it doesn’t fit right, you don’t want to miss out on such a nice sweater. At least it’s something you liked knitting, so if it is reknit it isn’t so bad!

  3. Merry Christmas !!!!
    Due to all the christmas cheer I’ve started blogging again. So I just thought I’d let you know as most people told me I ought to blog over christmas. Love JUlia x

  4. Oh my goodness. What a predicament. I am not the one to ask about frogging–it takes me so long to knit anything that frogging is something I rarely do. But if you wouldn’t wear it as is…. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

  5. From here, it looks beautiful! I know this has to be a tough decision, but I guess you have to decide whether or not you’re going to wear it as is.

  6. Oh no, please don’t frog it! It looks absolutely gorgeous on that pic, and what a lot of time you spent knitting it up! But then again, if it doesn’t fit right and you wouldn’t wear it anyway, then it might be a not so bad idea to start it all over again with longer body parts. I agree with Monica, we’d definitely need a modelled shot!

  7. What a dilemma you have. I vote frog it, though, since you like knitting the pattern and having done it once you can turn it into something you’ll really love. Easy for me to say, though, since I didn’t put a gazillion hours into it, huh? It’s so hard to tell anything from those model’s pictures. She’s skinny as a stick and they probably picked the best 2 pictures out of a thousand to put in the mag. Good luck!

  8. Cathy, thanks so much for posting. I have the sleeves done (only added 2″ in length) and just about finished the first decrease on the bottom, so I am defiantely happy to read and see your analysis. I need to read the pattern and see where to add the length, looks like above the bottom gussets.

    I totally understanding wanting to frog, and your analysis is dead on. thanks, Lori

    Monica – frogging is to rip out and re knit, get it “ripit ripit ripti” tee hee

  9. Agree with you about the length, as I am ‘lucky’ (on this occasion) in being short from neck to waist, so for me the fit isn’t too bad, but I think that most normally sized people would want to lengthen the bit between the panels and the armhole by at least 2 inches. WIll be posting a photo on my blog later today (if I can get it done in daylight!)

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